Cyberbullying

Moderated by Leah Wing

 

As information communication technology has become intricately woven into our lives, humans have harnessed their capacity for extraordinarily creative innovations to foster human connection across time and space.  Yet, sadly and perhaps not unexpectedly, we have also brought into new ICT forums our capacity for cruelty and domination through bullying.  Do different mediums of cyberbullying (text, picture, Internet, video) produce different impacts on victims?  Can one form be more damaging than another?  What gender and cultural dynamics impact cyberbullying?  What legislation, public policies, and educational and commercial practices are in place to prevent and handle cyberbullying?  What ODR platforms and software can or are addressing this problem?  How can the strengths of ICT, such as lessening isolation, be capitalized upon to reduce the effects of Cyberbullying?

 

New challenges and opportunities face our field to contribute to the prevention and handling of bullying through ICT avenues.  Join us for this conversation!

 

A final note:  It is requested that personal identifying details of actual cases are not shared and that anyone who believes that they have or are experiencing cyberbullying seek assistance from those whom they trust since this forum cannot serve as a source for handling such cases. 

 

One link among many which can be of help is:  

http://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/how-to-report/index.html

 

Moderator Bio:

Leah Wing is Co-Director, National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution http://odr.info is Senior Lecturer, Legal Studies Program, Political Science Department, University of Massachusetts/Amherst (US) and is founding director of the Social Justice Mediation Institute.  She has served on the Board of Directors of the Association of Conflict Resolution (2002-6) and has been a member of the editorial board of Conflict Resolution Quarterly since 2002.  Her publications concentrate on the critical examination of conflict transformation theory and practices in both the online and offline worlds and her most recent publication is “Online Dispute Resolution and the Development of Theory” co-authored with Dan Rainey in M. Waahab, D. Rainey and E. Katsh, Online Dispute Resolution: Theory and Practice (2012). 

 

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Replies to This Discussion

I think that educators definitely need to be required to take some sort of training on cyber-bullying. Furthermore, I think that this should be a topic that is highly emphasized in these curriculums, not just touched upon and then forgotten.

While I think that obviously teachers are the most direct way to communicate this information, I think sports coaches should also have to take a training in it. I think this because children look up to coaches in a different way than they do to teachers. Coaches also have a bigger influence if they use an approach that their will be a suspension or punishment from the team if a cyber-bullying incident occurs.

Leah Wing said:

There have been quite a number of calls for educating parents and children (especially beginning at an early age) as one important strategy for preventing cyberbullying.  Are there gatekeeping mechanisms that ought to be put in place (and if so where?) for helping to structurally determine that this happens?  For example, should teacher education and principal certification programs within Schools of Education require exposure to curriculum on cyber/bullying?  Are there other public policies that can be put in place that require schools to have policies about teacher and parent training on cyer/bullying in order to receive public funds?  What other gatekeeping mechanisms might help and what are some concerns you have about having such mechanisms?

Someone made a point earlier in this discussion that there is no clear line distinguishing what is protected by the 1st Amendment is what is punishable by the law. This line needs to lose its ambiguity in order for real change and justice to be brought forth. There was no “cyberbulling” clause created in the eighteenth century extending our freedom of speech rights to hurting others and causing everlasting harm to them. Yes- freedom of speech is a beautiful right that every citizen holds, but when too much is too much a line needs to be drawn somewhere, especially when “freedom of speech” turns into such a damaging problem for today’s youth in particular. Technology is changing in some ways to deter and report cyber bullying. Facebook, Twitter, etc have a variety of privacy settings in which an individual can control who looks at their page and who can see the material sent from that page. They also have ways of reporting offensive material. This reporting system can, in some way, make the “shield” of the cyber world a little more transparent for the bully.

 

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!

Richard Shaughnessy said:

Someone made a point earlier in this discussion that there is no clear line distinguishing what is protected by the 1st Amendment is what is punishable by the law. This line needs to lose its ambiguity in order for real change and justice to be brought forth. There was no “cyberbulling” clause created in the eighteenth century extending our freedom of speech rights to hurting others and causing everlasting harm to them. Yes- freedom of speech is a beautiful right that every citizen holds, but when too much is too much a line needs to be drawn somewhere, especially when “freedom of speech” turns into such a damaging problem for today’s youth in particular. Technology is changing in some ways to deter and report cyber bullying. Facebook, Twitter, etc have a variety of privacy settings in which an individual can control who looks at their page and who can see the material sent from that page. They also have ways of reporting offensive material. This reporting system can, in some way, make the “shield” of the cyber world a little more transparent for the bully.

 

I think there should be gatekeeping mechanisms put in place to structurally determine education as one important strategy for preventing cyberbullying. Once people are educated about the causes and effects of cyberbullying, there will be a greater and more consistent cry for reform by people of all ages. Ultimately, gatekeeping mechanisms, such as legislation, will be created as a result of public pressure.

However, although I believe that education and legislation are necessary to combat this problem, I'm also concerned about the effects of these gatekeeping mechanisms. It should be emphasized that education is only one strategy for preventing cyberbullying. By referencing the shield the first amendment provides, it is apparent that legislation often prohibits innovation. Unfortunately, cyberbullying is an issue that will never go away. Technology is changing everyday and elementary school children can have unlimited access to social media and the internet by simply being on their phones. Because technology is changing so quickly, legislation and gatekeeping mechanisms should evolve as quickly as technology. I'm worried that if mechanisms are put in place, it will leave out a lot of other venues where people can cyberbullying, such as iPhone apps, and will ultimately have little effect on the goal we are trying to achieve. Furthermore, I'm concerned about the large role of school administration in preventing cyberbullying and holding individuals responsible. In a number of suicides caused by cyberbullying, the media reports that the victim and his or her family contacted administration a number of times about the bullying the child received. In these cases, administration either did nothing, did not enforce punishments on the bullies or did not act appropriately to make sure the victim was not continually bullied. In the end, I think that the first step is definitely education. However, before mechanisms are put in place to prevent cyberbullying, there must be research about the potential problems that these mechanisms can cause. 

Leah Wing said:

There have been quite a number of calls for educating parents and children (especially beginning at an early age) as one important strategy for preventing cyberbullying.  Are there gatekeeping mechanisms that ought to be put in place (and if so where?) for helping to structurally determine that this happens?  For example, should teacher education and principal certification programs within Schools of Education require exposure to curriculum on cyber/bullying?  Are there other public policies that can be put in place that require schools to have policies about teacher and parent training on cyer/bullying in order to receive public funds?  What other gatekeeping mechanisms might help and what are some concerns you have about having such mechanisms?

Exploring cyberbullying....and F2F bullying.........

To try a different approach, I'm starting a word scramble/brainstorm with two questions:

 

1. What constitutes bullying via technology (including stalking)?

2. Similarities and differences tech v F2F bullying (incl stalking)

 

Cyberbullying - in one word: creepy, invasive, intrusive, disruptive to useful work, stops intimacy with others, inane, repetitive, toxic, painful, disrespectful, humiliating, extremely unhealthy, uncollaborative, aggressive, extremely controlling, selfish, extremely territorial, extremely possessive........not something you want to be around. 

 

Question 1:

-River waterfall of negative words, imagery

-Fishing&Flaunting: bully digs online for info and then flaunts this private info of target

-hangup phone calls, useless phone messages, silence phone messages, partytime phone messages,

-cuts internet access, messages disappear, sending/receiving emails is slowed/stopped repeatedly

-over time, the messaging from the bully gets more intimate, closer, squeezing out other influences in life.

-some cyberbully relentlessly, others wait and pounce.

 

Question 2:

-tech stalking enables them to surprise the target repeatedly

-tech stalking enables them to interfere with others contacting the target (side-by-side messages, blocked messages)

-combo of tech and F2F enables elite-level management of the target's life.

 

Similar to a drowning dynamic, the bully keeps grabbing hold of the target and pushing them down.

 

The effect on the target is cumulative. 

 

Like grains of sand blowing in from an open window, the start of tech bullying, is difficult to notice at first. Starts as little annoyances.  Then the timing of the annoyances becomes very obvious.   Along with the volume of messaging.

 

Power over, control of target.  Need to be heard by the target.

 

-often sexual

-periodically uses powdered drugs in target's food/drinks

-ridicules potential friendships/relationships

-asks how much money target has

-withholds reasonable goals in target's life

 

Many people don't understand cyberbullying.  They don't understand the dynamic or the extent of the situation.  They just know there is a "problem". 

 

****More work needs to be done to encourage professional associations and groups to educate themselves on this topic.  Cyberbullying is extremely serious and it is here to stay.  And professional bodies need to get up to speed.

As a 3rd year university student, I grew up around all of these new technologies that now facilitate for cyberbullying. Today's youth seems far more adept in instantly adapting to new technology where older generations may struggle, and no doubt this trend will continue even as my generation ages. Older generations, then, will most likely always struggle to comprehend the social activities of their children or students as the social/technological platforms that they utilize constantly evolve . I believe that any strategy for dealing with cyberbullying needs to be more broad or adaptive than, say, a strategy that may target individual technological platforms.


For example, while it is fair to say that on Facebook a user can alter their privacy settings or delete a 'friend' that might be giving them trouble, this may certainly solve the problem in the short term but could have greater ramifications in the schoolyard or workplace. I know friends who, even as grown adults today, become offended when a contact on Facebook deletes them as a friend. In the schoolyard particularly, children are sometimes very brutal; they can be quite uncivilized where adults may not be. Moreover, there are hundreds of other ways for people to contact others online regardless. First came email, then instant messaging, then the emergence of several prominent social networks and surely many other mediums in-between. Policing them all seems very unrealistic - and I've not even mentioned how difficult it is to keep up with the constant evolutions in smartphone technologies.

I realise now that I have reiterated many problems without proposing any solutions, but developing solutions is difficult. I would suggest that, in the case of a parent looking to protect their child, having a single family computer in a busy part of the home and installing parental filters is a good tried and tested first step. However in this age it may be hard for a parent to deny their teenager access to the online social mediums that all of their friends are a part of. In the case of phones, not only am I unaware of the existence of any kind of parental filter, but I doubt any would be able to keep up with the constant evolutions in not only physical smartphone handset technologies but also the Apps available for easy download on them, where hundreds more are available every day. 

As a young elementary school student in Australia, I remember the anti-bullying 'programs' that my school adopted. We were just kids, but even then the anti-bullying messages that the teachers conveyed seemed like nothing more than empty tokenism. As soon as we kids left the classroom, we made jokes and teased the teacher's words, never taking anything seriously.

As School Captain in my senior year of high school, I initiated an anti-bullying 'think-tank' program with the help of my English teacher. Together we managed to assemble an eager young group of minds from all levels of the school (grades 7-12), meeting once a week to discuss ideas and to implement the better ones. We had simple goals, but even then, many years after my childhood, it was difficult to conceive ideas that progressed beyond slogans and 'education'.

I believe one of my greatest, founding ambitions was to produce a pamphlet in conjunction with the school counselor that would be discretely available for any students struggling with bullying. It was to simply contain phone numbers for free-call, government/charity telephone counseling services (such as the 'Kids Help Line'), youth groups and contact hours for the school counselor. Unfortunately, in my time there I never was able to bring my idea to fruition but I think our group was heading in the right direction. I hope they progressed with the idea after my departure, because I think that offering something to students that was more discrete than being seen in the counselor's office as a 'weak', 'victim' of bullying was a definite start.   

As I said, though, I offer no real solutions. I think my main, underlying point is that any mechanism for helping kids cope with any kind of bullying (cyber or not) needs to be discrete, because nobody wants to be seen as 'weak' or as a 'victim'. The whole premise of the internet is that is accessible anywhere. It is incredibly discrete, and a user can represent themselves as somebody else or even completely anonymously. This surely helps foster the problem of cyberbullying, but perhaps it could also help play a role in dealing with it.

Leah Wing said:

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!

Rhys brings up a great point that nobody wants to be seen as the "victim." Yesterday, I talked to my 16 year old sister about cyberbullying and how she would get help if she was bullied. She said that the anonymity of Facebook "reporting" was a great way to prevent bullying because the bully does not know you reported him or her. I asked her if she would ever consider telling our parents or the school administration and she said no. Since school administration and our parents would react and confront the bully, she said she would be deemed a "snitch" (someone who tells on another person) and further bullied.

I think my sister's story reveals some of the problems and feelings of hopelessness that victims face. When it is not promised that parents and school administration can stop bullies, children do not feel the incentive to reveal themselves as victims. Furthermore, Facebook's unreliable reporting service is prone to inaction when people do report harassment and bullying. Overall, I feel like mediation would be a great tool for reconciling the perpetrators and victims of cyberbullying. However, mediation is may not be an option for people are who bullied by someone they do not know. Although some could argue that online mediation could be an option, I think that a face-to-face mediation program for the victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying is the best option because of cyberbullying's impersonal and anonymous nature.


Rhys Thorpe said:

As a 3rd year university student, I grew up around all of these new technologies that now facilitate for cyberbullying. Today's youth seems far more adept in instantly adapting to new technology where older generations may struggle, and no doubt this trend will continue even as my generation ages. Older generations, then, will most likely always struggle to comprehend the social activities of their children or students as the social/technological platforms that they utilize constantly evolve . I believe that any strategy for dealing with cyberbullying needs to be more broad or adaptive than, say, a strategy that may target individual technological platforms.


For example, while it is fair to say that on Facebook a user can alter their privacy settings or delete a 'friend' that might be giving them trouble, this may certainly solve the problem in the short term but could have greater ramifications in the schoolyard or workplace. I know friends who, even as grown adults today, become offended when a contact on Facebook deletes them as a friend. In the schoolyard particularly, children are sometimes very brutal; they can be quite uncivilized where adults may not be. Moreover, there are hundreds of other ways for people to contact others online regardless. First came email, then instant messaging, then the emergence of several prominent social networks and surely many other mediums in-between. Policing them all seems very unrealistic - and I've not even mentioned how difficult it is to keep up with the constant evolutions in smartphone technologies.

I realise now that I have reiterated many problems without proposing any solutions, but developing solutions is difficult. I would suggest that, in the case of a parent looking to protect their child, having a single family computer in a busy part of the home and installing parental filters is a good tried and tested first step. However in this age it may be hard for a parent to deny their teenager access to the online social mediums that all of their friends are a part of. In the case of phones, not only am I unaware of the existence of any kind of parental filter, but I doubt any would be able to keep up with the constant evolutions in not only physical smartphone handset technologies but also the Apps available for easy download on them, where hundreds more are available every day. 

As a young elementary school student in Australia, I remember the anti-bullying 'programs' that my school adopted. We were just kids, but even then the anti-bullying messages that the teachers conveyed seemed like nothing more than empty tokenism. As soon as we kids left the classroom, we made jokes and teased the teacher's words, never taking anything seriously.

As School Captain in my senior year of high school, I initiated an anti-bullying 'think-tank' program with the help of my English teacher. Together we managed to assemble an eager young group of minds from all levels of the school (grades 7-12), meeting once a week to discuss ideas and to implement the better ones. We had simple goals, but even then, many years after my childhood, it was difficult to conceive ideas that progressed beyond slogans and 'education'.

I believe one of my greatest, founding ambitions was to produce a pamphlet in conjunction with the school counselor that would be discretely available for any students struggling with bullying. It was to simply contain phone numbers for free-call, government/charity telephone counseling services (such as the 'Kids Help Line'), youth groups and contact hours for the school counselor. Unfortunately, in my time there I never was able to bring my idea to fruition but I think our group was heading in the right direction. I hope they progressed with the idea after my departure, because I think that offering something to students that was more discrete than being seen in the counselor's office as a 'weak', 'victim' of bullying was a definite start.   

As I said, though, I offer no real solutions. I think my main, underlying point is that any mechanism for helping kids cope with any kind of bullying (cyber or not) needs to be discrete, because nobody wants to be seen as 'weak' or as a 'victim'. The whole premise of the internet is that is accessible anywhere. It is incredibly discrete, and a user can represent themselves as somebody else or even completely anonymously. This surely helps foster the problem of cyberbullying, but perhaps it could also help play a role in dealing with it.

Leah Wing said:

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!

In recent posts there has been a lot of talk on the privacy settings of social networking sites like facebook and twitter because one can report a post/picture etc anonymously, but more often that not when cyber-bullying happens there is not a button labeled "report".  I think that this speaks to how much, as a culture, we have become dependent on the fact that the internet is a place where we can remain anonymous.  It is seen even on cell phones when certain apps installed have the ability to change callback numbers or contact labels.  This emphasizes the need for more of these "report" buttons on applications besides facebook and twitter.  The iphone has an app called "find my iphone" which tracks the phone, if it is reported lost the phone, there needs to be something implemented like this (if possible) for unwanted text messages that come from anonymous people.  

Leah Wing said:

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!

Richard Shaughnessy said:

Someone made a point earlier in this discussion that there is no clear line distinguishing what is protected by the 1st Amendment is what is punishable by the law. This line needs to lose its ambiguity in order for real change and justice to be brought forth. There was no “cyberbulling” clause created in the eighteenth century extending our freedom of speech rights to hurting others and causing everlasting harm to them. Yes- freedom of speech is a beautiful right that every citizen holds, but when too much is too much a line needs to be drawn somewhere, especially when “freedom of speech” turns into such a damaging problem for today’s youth in particular. Technology is changing in some ways to deter and report cyber bullying. Facebook, Twitter, etc have a variety of privacy settings in which an individual can control who looks at their page and who can see the material sent from that page. They also have ways of reporting offensive material. This reporting system can, in some way, make the “shield” of the cyber world a little more transparent for the bully.

 

I believe what Mira is approaching is a very valid idea towards further prevention. The emphasis of remaining anonymous on the Internet and even cell phones these days are a drastic problem that ties directly to the core of cyberbullying. I too feel that if a tool was introduced to regulate text messages to and from anonymous people it would help drastically in prevention. I believe that the privacy control becoming an important and more apparent tool in social networks is a positive step towards only affiliating with those whom one wants to. However, direct messages can be sent to and from anyone, thus limiting how much “privacy” one particularly has. 

Potentially the introduction of a filter could be implemented in regards to phones and social network sites that would simply regulate messages sent and received based on ones particular “friends” of facebook, “followers” on twitter, or simply just people who exist in ones address book on their cell phones. Offering the tools of privacy is great for ones deliberate actions towards prevention, but with how developed technology is today I feel that actions need to be taken to intuitively help the issue. With the endless number of apps for phones and computers, I am sure a program exists to help the matter. However I feel that these programs should be implemented directly through the technologies the foundation of cyberbullying are actually found. 

“What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?”

 

-There are online awareness programs that strive to focus people’s attention to important matters such as bullying in schools and cyber bullying. These sites provide information of the topics as well as ways in which victims can reach out for help.

Here’s one example: http://projectbully.com/cyberbullying.html

 

This site provides not only the information on what cyber bullying is, but also ways in which parents can help their children, and even how these children or any of those being bullied can help themselves (especially if they want to remain anonymous).

 

One other thing that I’d like to mention about this site is the amount of videos that it provides detailing individual stories and preventative ideas/campaigns against bullying. In a world that has become so technologically dependent, I believe videos may have more of an impact on adolescents than simply reading facts and statistics. The visual component of a video is something that I believe can really strike a chord with today’s youth. I believe kids these days, even teens and young adults, are more likely to sit down and watch a five minute video on cyber bullying as opposed to reading a two page synopsis on why cyber bullying is a problem and how it can be stopped. 

 

Some of the videos were pretty moving and informative, so I suggest you check some of them out if you can!

 

 

What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!”

 

-As suggested in earlier posts, I believe that mediation can be a useful tactic in resolving cyber bullying issues (Especially at the school age level in which schools are heavily involved and often responsible for resolving the situation). Instead of simply punishing a bully by suspending them from school or placing them in detention, why not force them to meet their victim face to face? I believe confronting the bully and making them own up to their acts would have more of a deterring effect then simply sending them home with barely a slap on the wrist.

 

 In that situation there is no real resolution. No closure or explanation for the victim, and no legitimate punishment, deterrent or corrective measure put in place for the bully. If the two parties are made to come together, you may attain both of these goals (rehabilitation, closure, and comfort for the victim, and a productive punishment for the bully in which they must face their victim and explain their actions…hopefully deterring similar actions in the future). 



Leah Wing said:

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!


I watched the videos on projectbully.com that Conor posted earlier. I was completely moved and I think these videos are a tool that would be most successful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying. Technology is evolving so quickly and creating mechanisms that would disable bullying via technology are not advancing as fast as they need to be. By educating the youth and showing them realistic videos or hearing speakers discuss the impact that cyberbullying has had on them or their loved ones would be crucial. Childrens, teens and even adults do not always realize the full impact of their actions. We all say things that may not seem like a big deal to us but can be devastating to someone who is already at a fragile state of mind. The videos on projectbully.com are eye opening. Schools should devote time to educate their students and use these videos as tools to furthur engage children on the consequences of their actions. Adults should watch these videos as well. Education is key to solving this cyberbullying crisis.
 
Conor Nolan said:

“What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?”

 

-There are online awareness programs that strive to focus people’s attention to important matters such as bullying in schools and cyber bullying. These sites provide information of the topics as well as ways in which victims can reach out for help.

Here’s one example: http://projectbully.com/cyberbullying.html

 

This site provides not only the information on what cyber bullying is, but also ways in which parents can help their children, and even how these children or any of those being bullied can help themselves (especially if they want to remain anonymous).

 

One other thing that I’d like to mention about this site is the amount of videos that it provides detailing individual stories and preventative ideas/campaigns against bullying. In a world that has become so technologically dependent, I believe videos may have more of an impact on adolescents than simply reading facts and statistics. The visual component of a video is something that I believe can really strike a chord with today’s youth. I believe kids these days, even teens and young adults, are more likely to sit down and watch a five minute video on cyber bullying as opposed to reading a two page synopsis on why cyber bullying is a problem and how it can be stopped. 

 

Some of the videos were pretty moving and informative, so I suggest you check some of them out if you can!

 

 

What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!”

 

-As suggested in earlier posts, I believe that mediation can be a useful tactic in resolving cyber bullying issues (Especially at the school age level in which schools are heavily involved and often responsible for resolving the situation). Instead of simply punishing a bully by suspending them from school or placing them in detention, why not force them to meet their victim face to face? I believe confronting the bully and making them own up to their acts would have more of a deterring effect then simply sending them home with barely a slap on the wrist.

 

 In that situation there is no real resolution. No closure or explanation for the victim, and no legitimate punishment, deterrent or corrective measure put in place for the bully. If the two parties are made to come together, you may attain both of these goals (rehabilitation, closure, and comfort for the victim, and a productive punishment for the bully in which they must face their victim and explain their actions…hopefully deterring similar actions in the future). 



Leah Wing said:

Richard's points are well-taken; there are a few tools already available which could be useful for tracking cyberbullies.

As we begin to move into the final 24 hours of our forum, I'd like to invite further discussion of tools that already exist and to invite some creative thinking about what types of tools are needed.  

Here are a few questions to get us started:

1.  What tools already are available which can be useful in preventing and responding to cyberbullying?

2.  What are the types of tools that are still needed?  Let's be creative and think outside the box!


A website I came across a couple weeks ago is relevant to this topic for those who may be interested, check out http://www.antibullying.net/staffinfo.htm

This site is highly recommended for all children and adults alike because it contains content aimed at several age groups (children, adults) and professions (teachers, school staff). It has information on cyberbulling prevention in the schools and ways to carry this preventative approach at home. Preventative methods range from educating children about the law to praise and reward systems aimed to acknowledge good interactive behavior.

Also, if you follow the “resources” link you can listen to audio clips from experts speaking at different anti bullying conferences. 

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