Communication Theory & ODR: An Introduction and Orientation

Communication Theory & ODR: An Introduction and Orientation

Moderated by Bill Warters

This free learning module introduces Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) and provides some history of the field via an interactive timeline. Viewers can then dive into some useful general communication theory presented in a graphic novel format. This is followed by a review of some more specific theories that explore the potential impact of Computer Mediated Communication (as compared to face-to-face communication), both negative and positive, in Online Dispute Resolution contexts. Finally, readers are invited to explore some additional resources should they wish to dig deeper into the field. The module, developed by Bill Warters, drawing on the work of others in the field, is provided under a creative commons license permitting reuse with attribution.

The link to the module is:
http://campus-adr.net/ODRModule/index.html

 

Moderator Bio:

Bill Warters, Ph.D., is a faculty member at Wayne State University’s Department of Communication where he teaches courses on social conflict, mediation, and communication technologies and conflict among others. He is webmaster of CREducation.org, a site supporting conflict resolution in educational settings and developer of a new iPad app for conflict resolution educators.

 

 

 

______________________________________________

Return to Cyberweek 2012 Homepage

Views: 542

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Good discussion here. It is interesting to think about different sectors such as health and manufacturing in comparison to legal services and explore what may move the ODR ball forward. I wonder if the use of online ODR tools will start to grow more quickly now simply due to the convenience of not having to reenter data that you have already put into an online system earlier (ie ebay transaction details, amazon order, steel shipment manifest, e-health record). Perhaps the tipping point will be the shift to a "paperless" society in general, with ODR riding in on the convenience and speed coattails.

Thanks for the great responses to my question. I certainly hope the field grows even more in the future. 

Bill, this is excellent. I see it as a useful primer. As more and more practitioners become attracted to ODR - not just academicians and pracademicians (love that!) and systems builders and integrators - this can be a great introduction for them into the issues and how to adapt their work to an online context.

I agree with you, I think the shift to paperless can help boost the usage of ODR. I am reminded by many of my elders in the steel industry that purchase orders used to be sent by mail, inventory was tracked by cards much like a library system, etc. It took over 3 weeks to deliver steel to a customer. With the shift in technology we are now able to deliver steel the same day. The move to a paperless has improved delivery times, opened our eyes to needs, etc. Where my industry lacks is in disputes. Current disputes that cannot be resolved have to go to court due to the amount of money involved. This can be both inefficient and expensive for the company. I would like to see a system in my industry that takes pieces from other segments of ODR platforms used in different industries and builds on it.

Any suggestions?

Bill Warters said:

Good discussion here. It is interesting to think about different sectors such as health and manufacturing in comparison to legal services and explore what may move the ODR ball forward. I wonder if the use of online ODR tools will start to grow more quickly now simply due to the convenience of not having to reenter data that you have already put into an online system earlier (ie ebay transaction details, amazon order, steel shipment manifest, e-health record). Perhaps the tipping point will be the shift to a "paperless" society in general, with ODR riding in on the convenience and speed coattails.

Joshua, have you checked out Modria's enterprise solutions? If I'm understanding your situation correctly, you've got single-issue distributive disputes (i.e., how much money will change hands) that happen often enough and are inefficient enough that you're looking for a streamlined process. That sounds like their bailiwick.

Joshua Morris said:

I agree with you, I think the shift to paperless can help boost the usage of ODR. I am reminded by many of my elders in the steel industry that purchase orders used to be sent by mail, inventory was tracked by cards much like a library system, etc. It took over 3 weeks to deliver steel to a customer. With the shift in technology we are now able to deliver steel the same day. The move to a paperless has improved delivery times, opened our eyes to needs, etc. Where my industry lacks is in disputes. Current disputes that cannot be resolved have to go to court due to the amount of money involved. This can be both inefficient and expensive for the company. I would like to see a system in my industry that takes pieces from other segments of ODR platforms used in different industries and builds on it.

Any suggestions?

Bill Warters said:

Good discussion here. It is interesting to think about different sectors such as health and manufacturing in comparison to legal services and explore what may move the ODR ball forward. I wonder if the use of online ODR tools will start to grow more quickly now simply due to the convenience of not having to reenter data that you have already put into an online system earlier (ie ebay transaction details, amazon order, steel shipment manifest, e-health record). Perhaps the tipping point will be the shift to a "paperless" society in general, with ODR riding in on the convenience and speed coattails.

No I have not but I will definitely take a look, appreciate the feedback.

Jeff Bean said:

Joshua, have you checked out Modria's enterprise solutions? If I'm understanding your situation correctly, you've got single-issue distributive disputes (i.e., how much money will change hands) that happen often enough and are inefficient enough that you're looking for a streamlined process. That sounds like their bailiwick.

Joshua Morris said:

I agree with you, I think the shift to paperless can help boost the usage of ODR. I am reminded by many of my elders in the steel industry that purchase orders used to be sent by mail, inventory was tracked by cards much like a library system, etc. It took over 3 weeks to deliver steel to a customer. With the shift in technology we are now able to deliver steel the same day. The move to a paperless has improved delivery times, opened our eyes to needs, etc. Where my industry lacks is in disputes. Current disputes that cannot be resolved have to go to court due to the amount of money involved. This can be both inefficient and expensive for the company. I would like to see a system in my industry that takes pieces from other segments of ODR platforms used in different industries and builds on it.

Any suggestions?

Bill Warters said:

Good discussion here. It is interesting to think about different sectors such as health and manufacturing in comparison to legal services and explore what may move the ODR ball forward. I wonder if the use of online ODR tools will start to grow more quickly now simply due to the convenience of not having to reenter data that you have already put into an online system earlier (ie ebay transaction details, amazon order, steel shipment manifest, e-health record). Perhaps the tipping point will be the shift to a "paperless" society in general, with ODR riding in on the convenience and speed coattails.

This has been an interesting discussion on the potential of ODR and how communication plays such a huge role in ODR. I think the most important thing to remember when discussing the use of technology in conflict resolution is the idea of balance. While technology can and should be used to help resolve conflict it should never be a replacement for human capital. Conflicts are to tricky to be tackled with anything less than a fully functional human brain capable of divergent thinking and effective communication. Technology is not yet at a point where it can think for itself so the human element is still of the upmost importance. And these people need to be able to communicate effectively when they use new technology. They need to understand both the new technological advances and the people they are meant to help.   

RSS

@ADRHub Tweets

ADRHub is supported and maintained by the Negotiation & Conflict Resolution Program at Creighton University

Members

© 2019   Created by ADRhub.com - Creighton NCR.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service