Teaching negotiation and collaboration concepts through short e-modules

Teaching negotiation and collaboration concepts through short e-modules: two examples and assessing the potential

Moderated by John Stephens

 

As a starting point, please review these two e-modules regarding key ADR/problem-solving self-guided modules:

 

Colleagues in the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute (UVA-VA Tech) and the Collaborative Governance Certificate (University of Arizona) have used the modules with positive results.

 

As ADR/negotiation learning moves from book-learning and in-class teaching, to videos, to other mixed media, I will share my experience and learn from others about online methods for teaching and learning in short modules.

 

These self-guided modules are used as a supplement to face-to-face teaching. I have applied them in my continuing education classes (mainly local and state government officials in North Carolina), and graduate students (MPA, MSW, MPH, JD).

 

I am seeking:

  • Feedback on the pros and cons of this kind of teaching instrument in general, and specific to ADR education.
  • Participants experience developing or viewing similar “teach one concept” modules.

 

Moderator Bio:

John Stephens is an Associate Professor at the School of Government, UNC at Chapel Hill. He has been teaching workshops for government officials and graduate courses in public administration for over 15 years. John’s first e-module was created in 2007, and he created two webinars, 2009-11.  John taught in an asynchronous format for the UNC Public Health Leadership Institute in 2003. John leads the public dispute resolution program, and specializes in public participation and collaborative governance. http://www.sog.unc.edu/node/93

 

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Replies to This Discussion

To start the conversation -
What are the pros and cons of these short modules for training/teaching key concepts?

Possible Pros: Short, appeals to visual learners, available 24/7; could be useful to help people about to negotiate/do ADR work.

Possible Cons: Too simple, not enough different kinds of examples, needs more\ interactive elements.
Hi, John. I haven't tried any training in such short chunks, but think the modules are great -- clear, interesting, and short enough to lure people in.

I'm interesting in how you use these to supplement face-to-face teaching. Also, has anyone had any experience using modules like these without related face-to-face opportunities?

Ellen
Ellen - thanks for your comment; glad you thought the modules look good.
Per your query: how use the modules to supplement face-to-face teaching: I use them as an advance assignment; either prior to a workshop or in a graduate level course. While I think they "are simple" it provides a known base from which I can do more in F2F settings; e.g., more challenging kinds of exercises on distinguishing positions from interests.

One your other query - I do not have any information; hope others can chime in.
Thanks.

I think the presentation is spot-on.  It does a great job identifying the differentiation between positions and interests and as you say, that is absolutely a key component in any conflict.  

Hi John.  I just viewed the scales of consensus module and I agree with earlier positive comments. It was well organized, moved along briskly, provided new content, and offered some context for deciding when to use each tool that wasn't so specific so as to leave groups out. 

The use of consensus seems to beg for a skilled facilitator who will be effective in drawing out people with concerns or who delays before calling for a check until sufficient discussion or brainstorming of options has occurred. Seems like creating all the modules that gradually fill in the skill set of a facilitator might keep you busy for a while!

Thanks for sharing. Do I gather that there is a fee for purchase of these modules outside of your work context?

Michael - thanks for the positive assessment. Please see my next post to move the discussion forward.


 
Michael Phillips said:

I think the presentation is spot-on.  It does a great job identifying the differentiation between positions and interests and as you say, that is absolutely a key component in any conflict.  

Bill - thanks for your review of the scales of consensus module.

It was interesting working, in part, with other people's material, RE: the Kaner, et.al. book referenced at the end.

 

I agree with your point about the skills in how and when to employ a test for consensus. I am unsure if that part of facilitation could be conveyed in a similar module; maybe more likely through video clips to try to show "too early" and "too late" examples; very hard to show just right. What do you think?

Please see my next question for you and the others on the forum.

Thanks, John
 
Bill Warters said:

Hi John.  I just viewed the scales of consensus module and I agree with earlier positive comments. It was well organized, moved along briskly, provided new content, and offered some context for deciding when to use each tool that wasn't so specific so as to leave groups out. 

The use of consensus seems to beg for a skilled facilitator who will be effective in drawing out people with concerns or who delays before calling for a check until sufficient discussion or brainstorming of options has occurred. Seems like creating all the modules that gradually fill in the skill set of a facilitator might keep you busy for a while!

Thanks for sharing. Do I gather that there is a fee for purchase of these modules outside of your work context?

New set of questions - moving our discussion forward:

How do the two modules compare to other similar online teaching units you have experienced?

I have tried to find similar negotiation, communication or collaboration modules teaching on key concepts and have not been successful.  I know there are many videos, essentially recorded lectures, that cover a variety of topics. For example, here is one about “setting the stage” for negotiation from Professor Guhan Subramanian of  Harvard's Program on Negotiation http://www.mediate.com/articles/SubramanianGbl20120911.cfm

 

Is a video like this more effective than a narrated slide-show style presentation? 

I like some parts of Dr. Guhan's video and not other elements. What do you think?

 What other tools have you used or experienced for asynchronous learning – videos, modules, puzzles, games?

John--

Great modules -- often these types of self-paced components go on too long, but yours are sharp and to the point, so they really hold the viewer's interest.

Videos can work well when they are well made, but getting it right is harder than most people think.  And people tune out after a couple of minutes.

I really like using games as learning tools.  I thought that the NYTimes budget exercise was genius:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/13/weekinreview/deficits...

There's been a fair amount written about some of the more inventive experiments:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6342324

Maybe we could turn some of the PON negotiation games into playable online modules.  Goodness knows the next generation is as game-acclimatized as any generation in history!

rah

Colin,

I really enjoyed the NYTimes budget exercise as well. Also as you mentioned the younger generation is full of gaming fanatics. Maybe we can move ODR with this generation to a one game winner take all online match. Seems like a stretch but traction is needed for advancements in ODR, so maybe by appealing to the public that is using the programs, we can gain traction and also improvements to ODR forums.

Colin Rule said:

John--

Great modules -- often these types of self-paced components go on too long, but yours are sharp and to the point, so they really hold the viewer's interest.

Videos can work well when they are well made, but getting it right is harder than most people think.  And people tune out after a couple of minutes.

I really like using games as learning tools.  I thought that the NYTimes budget exercise was genius:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/13/weekinreview/deficits...

There's been a fair amount written about some of the more inventive experiments:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6342324

Maybe we could turn some of the PON negotiation games into playable online modules.  Goodness knows the next generation is as game-acclimatized as any generation in history!

rah

John,

I am a fan of the narrated slide show. For Professor Bill Walters class I was tasked with putting together a info-activism campaign. I felt like i was able to appeal more to an audience by putting together a narrated slide show rather than just lecturing my point. There are only a handful of speakers that can keep everyone in the room engaged long enough to get through a lecture, so by having the narrated slide show you are able to dive deeper in your point with photos, music, etc.

http://stoppolcorruption.blogspot.com/



John B. Stephens said:

New set of questions - moving our discussion forward:

How do the two modules compare to other similar online teaching units you have experienced?

I have tried to find similar negotiation, communication or collaboration modules teaching on key concepts and have not been successful.  I know there are many videos, essentially recorded lectures, that cover a variety of topics. For example, here is one about “setting the stage” for negotiation from Professor Guhan Subramanian of  Harvard's Program on Negotiation http://www.mediate.com/articles/SubramanianGbl20120911.cfm

 

Is a video like this more effective than a narrated slide-show style presentation? 

I like some parts of Dr. Guhan's video and not other elements. What do you think?

 What other tools have you used or experienced for asynchronous learning – videos, modules, puzzles, games?

Joshua, Colin - thanks for the good comments. Not sure you will see this, since I am writing on Nov. 5.

Colin - any more connected "games" to ADR key concepts - RE: communication, framing issues, etc.?
Thanks. John

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