Visualizing ADR and ODR

Moderated by Bill Warters

 

Many of us are visual learners and creative thinkers. Sometimes a picture is really worth a thousand words. In this forum, we'll focus on the ways that visualization techniques can help us build understanding of conflict processes and promote engagement with Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) tools and techniques. With your help, we'll try to illustrate some core ADR and ODR processes, visualize current trends, and make connections between various aspects of the work. In addition to conflict resolution processes, we might also explore ways in which visualization techniques are being used in the waging of social conflict, for instance in social change and human rights campaigns. Finally, we are interested in sharing examples of the use of visualizations when working with parties engaged in complex conflicts as a way to help them move closer to agreement or mutual understanding. Your contributions, both artistic and reflective, are welcome.

 

Hi Folks. Welcome to the Visualizing ADR/ODR Forum. Glad to have you with us. Here are some ways you can engage with the materials I have prepared and with your other Cyberweek colleagues.

1) Browse our Visualizing ADR/ODR Pinterest Board of more than 150 images for one that strikes your fancy or stimulates your theoretical juices or which just seems highly relevent to understanding ODR. Copy the image link or embed code into your forum comment (use the "html" button in the edit bar before adding embed code) and then explain what you find interesting about it, or the questions it raises for you.

2) Share your creativity. Contribute a post or two with graphics on ADR or ODR that you have created or remixed. Gather praise, feedback, or silent admiration from your peers.

3) Comment on other postings to this forum, keeping the conversation going.

4) Dive boldly into the Mural.ly image canvas I have created to organize some of the many available images. Here's the link: http://mrl.li/PxboS7

5) If you are feeling really creative (or maybe just curious), you can try your hand at editing a shared murl.ly page exploring Online Dispute Resolution. To get started, visit http://mrl.li/QLje7z and use the password "cyberweekrocks". You can drag and drop content from the web (or a Pinterest item from our collection perhaps, or a video, etc) or your computer, and modify mural as you need. Use the toolbar on the left to add stickers or text or shapes.

Looking forward to the week ahead. Thanks for joining in.

Sincerely,

Bill Warters

Moderator Bio:

Bill Warters, Ph.D., is a faculty member at Wayne State University’s Department of Communication where he teaches courses on social conflict, mediation, and communication technologies and conflict among others. He is webmaster of CREducation.org, a site supporting conflict resolution in educational settings and developer of a new iPad app for conflict resolution educators. More information on Bill's various projects can be found at www.campus-adr.net.

______________________________________________

Return to Cyberweek 2012 Homepage

Views: 1439

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hello Alberto! 

Thank you for sharing the graphics collection with odrlatinoamerica AND for sharing the beautiful posters and logo from your projects. Clearly you have the heart of a poet and the eyes of an artist in addition to your great organizing skills. 

Cheers,

Bill Warters

Thanks a lot Bill, you job it's amazing!!!! later I'll share more images

Alberto

Cyberweek2012

empathy, entering into the feelings of another

Alberto - I like the image of the dancers for ODR 2010. Technology can help us dance more beautifully together when in conflict perhaps. And the empathy shoes are great as well. 

If we are thinking in an inspirational way, these images from our Visualizing ADR Pinterest Board are ones that I liked.

 

 

Source: via Bill on Pinterest

 

Fascinating conversation.

I attended a two day meeting that was led by a graphic facilitator back in the 90s -- he had a HUGE piece of paper in the front of the room, and everything we did was represented by his cartoons over the two days.  At the end, we almost had a piece of fine art.  This is kind of the same idea:

http://www.imagethink.net/

There's something about seeing an image being drawn.  We just did a video for Modria using that kind of effect:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=o4XtV2P...

Also, we went through a long logo design process with a professional logo designer before we settled on our current logo:

...it's amazing to work with someone who develops logos like this for his or her living.  People respond to images on both an intellectual and emotional level.  It's something we need to think more about in ADR.

I was also thinking about using images to present complex information, a la Tufte.  It's so rare to encounter a facilitator who can really use graphic design to its full effect in helping parties reach agreement.  And the web is such a visual medium -- incorporating animations and 3D -- it's a natural.

Definitely got me thinking.  Thanks!

rah

Hi Colin we posted your Modria video at spanish cyberweek chapter!  all the best

Alberto

link:http://odrlatinoamerica.ning.com/forum/topic/show?id=2552211%3ATopi...

I really liked browsing through all of the articles on the pinboard and found it difficult to pick one to write about.  So many of the images invoked not only connections and appealed to me, but they also immediately connected to feelings and emotions that I could easily relate to, and found commonalities with.  The image I picked to discuss was the "Is There An App For That?" seen below. We are so quick to use our emotions and our history with a person or situation, that we often have difficulty managing these emotions and keeping them in check.  With all of the options that are on the "app"'s dial, I find it amusing how of all of the options, only mediate is one that utilizes all of the skills and techniques that go into effective decision making. Obviously that is the point of the diagram, but I think anyone that looks at the picture can think back to any number of times in which they rushed through the decision making process and made a hasty decision via ignoring someone or some facts, by simply flipping a coin, or by delegating out the decision to another.  I think it would be neat to see how someone's individual thinking would be changed if we would think about this picture everytime we were going to make a decision.  In a different take on the commercials with the "easy button" if this wheel would spin and we would make the decision based off of where the dial landed, it would be interesting to see how different the results and the decision-making process' effects would be on those involved.

 App

Great image choice Brian, and thanks for giving us a new topic. Your point about partial or incomplete decision-making approaches being common is really interesting. My sense is that some of these other approaches (other than mediation) like flip a coin win because they are quick and don't require too much personal sharing of inner thoughts and feelings or time taken generating and reviewing options. Another thing your choice makes me think about is how valuable good mobile apps might be in helping us get more sophisticated in our conflict responses.

Brian Kooienga said:

... The image I picked to discuss was the "Is There An App For That?" seen below. We are so quick to use our emotions and our history with a person or situation, that we often have difficulty managing these emotions and keeping them in check.  With all of the options that are on the "app"'s dial, I find it amusing how of all of the options, only mediate is one that utilizes all of the skills and techniques that go into effective decision making. Obviously that is the point of the diagram, but I think anyone that looks at the picture can think back to any number of times in which they rushed through the decision making process and made a hasty decision via ignoring someone or some facts, by simply flipping a coin, or by delegating out the decision to another.  I think it would be neat to see how someone's individual thinking would be changed if we would think about this picture everytime we were going to make a decision.  In a different take on the commercials with the "easy button" if this wheel would spin and we would make the decision based off of where the dial landed, it would be interesting to see how different the results and the decision-making process' effects would be on those involved.

this has been a wodnerful forum, Bill and everyone. The Pintrest link is a treasure trove!

I really enjoyed looking at these images. The most thought provoking image that struck me was "There are two sides of every story." As a student new to both ADR and ODR, it has been interesting to learn of specific instances in history, such as the Irish Truth and Reconciliation Commission, where each person holds a different perspective of the past. Moving forward, I feel it important to not quickly pass judgments or hold bias in both professional ADR as well as our daily lives. Being able to take a step back and recognize all relevant information from all angles is crucial to effective solutions. 

RSS

@ADRHub Tweets

ADRHub is supported and maintained by the Negotiation & Conflict Resolution Program at Creighton University

Members

© 2020   Created by ADRhub.com - Creighton NCR.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service