Cyberweek 2012 – Take 2: Return of the online mediation competition!

We’ve been missing a good, full-blown ODR tournament for several years now. No more! Cyberweek 2012’s eMediation competition provided the goods, and more. Organizer Katrina Nobles paints a picture of this tournament.

Compared with the ADR scene, in which negotiation and mediation competitions at the national and international level are proliferating (for example, see this description of a competition I participated in judging in Beijing for students from all across China, and read this comparative look at other competitions), the ODR scene has been pretty quiet on this front for a while. Sure, Smartsettle holds competitions on their platform every so often, including every Cyberweek, but it’s been about four years since the last ICODR (International Competition for Online Dispute Resolution), a full-blow tournament of online mediation, negotiation and advocacy, has been held.

Cyberweek 2012 saw the return of such a tournament in the form of the eMediation competition organized by Cornell University’s Scheinman Institute on Conflict Resolution.

While I mentioned the winners and runner ups in my first post summarizing Cyberweek 2012, this event was so exciting that I invited its organizer, Katrina Nobles of the Scheinman Institute, to guest-blog and share the names, numbers and behind-the-scenes of this event. The rest of this post is Katrina’s voice; the applause you hear in the background as you read through it, though, is mine   :-)

Noam

----------------------------

Cyberweek 2012 – eMediation Competition

Co-sponsored by Cornell University’s Scheinman Institute on Conflict Resolution and Modria

Utilizing an online platform provided by Modria’s Mediation Room, students from across the world competed in an eMediation competition during Cyberweek 2012. The platform provided conversation threads in an asynchronous communication environment, allowing students to communicate from different time zones. By next year’s competition, Modria’s mediation room will be able to accommodate asynchronous communication, as well as synchronous communication in the form of text chat and video-conferencing.

Students in the competition could play the role of the mediator or the role of the parties involved in the dispute. The students competed in two rounds of competition. The first round included an employment dispute, while the second round included a small claims/community dispute. Those students playing the role of mediator were judged on their ability to provide an informative opening statement, convey a collaborative behavioral style, use active listening skills, reframe each party’s perspective, remain objective during the process, address the parties’ behavioral styles, and empower the parties to be collaborative and generate creative solutions. Students playing the role of a disputing party were judged on their ability to present their case well, use active listening skills, work well together as a team, use a problem-solving approach, generate creative solutions, gather information from and communicate with the opposing party well, and appropriately respond to the mediator and opposing party.

Colleges and universities represented by the 44 students in the competition included: Capital University Law School, Cornell University ILR School, Cornell University Law School, Creighton University, Marquette University Law School, Ohio State University, Seattle University, Singapore Management University, South Texas College of Law, Southern Methodist University, Tbilisi State University, Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero, and Wayne State University. Programs of study the students are involved in range across several fields including Conflict Studies, Law, Industrial and Labor Relations, and Public Administration.

The esteemed panel of judges for the competition included: Ariel Avgar, Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois School of Labor & Employment Relations and College of Medicine; John Bickerman, Bickerman Dispute Resolution, PLLC; Noam Ebner, Assistant Professor and Online Program Chair of the Werner Institute at Creighton University; Judith Meyer, Adjunct Faculty at the Cornell Law School, and Owner of J.P. Meyer Commercial Dispute Solutions; and, Daniel Rainey, Chief of Staff for the National Mediation Board. Students were judged out of a total possible score of 40 points for each round.

First Round Results:

Mediator
1st place: Maria Eugenia Solé, Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero (39 points)

2nd place: Samantha Torres, South Texas College of Law (37 points)
3rd place: Mingzi Ouyang, Ohio State Law; Becky Riger, Capital University Law; Karen Middlebrook, South Texas College of Law (all scoring 36 points)

Party A
1st place: Mahalia Burford, Cornell Law School (37 points)
2nd place: Suzanne Rose, Southern Methodist University; Susanne Donnovan and Simon Boehme, Cornell ILR School (both teams scoring 36 points)
3rd place: Michael Hand, Southern Methodist University (35 points)

Party B
1st place: Denise Hedges, Southern Methodist University (40 points)
2nd place: Shilei Wee, Debbie Lee Mei Yong, Singapore Management University (39 points)
3rd place: Todd Dickey, Cornell ILR School (36 points)

 

Second Round Results:

Mediator
1st place: Firas Alsalih, Creighton University; Ferdinand Redulla, Cornell Law School (both scoring 40 points)
2nd place: Becky Riger, Capital University Law (38 points)
3rd place: Samantha Torres, South Texas College of Law; Maria Eugenia Solé, Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero (both scoring 33 points)

Party A
1st place: Goeffrey Madu, Southern Methodist University (40 points)
2nd place: Michael Hand, Southern Methodist University (39 points)
3rd place: Abdiel Huerta, Southern Methodist University; Phallyn Thornton (both scoring 37 points)

Party B
1st place: Denise Hedges, Southern Methodist University (39 points)
2nd place: Shilei Wee, Debbie Lee Mei Yong, Singapore Management University (38 points)
3rd place: Todd Dickey, Cornell ILR School (35 points)

 

Final Results (Round 1 + Round 2)

Mediator
1st place: Becky Riger, Capital University Law (74 points)
2nd place: Maria Eugenia Solé, Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero; Firas Alsalih, Creighton University (both scoring 72 points)
3rd place: Samantha Torres, South Texas College of Law (70 points)

Party A
1st place: Michael Hand, Southern Methodist University (74 points)
2nd place: Mahalia Burford, Cornell Law School (72 points)
3rd place: Suzanne Rose, Southern Methodist University (69 points)

Party B
1st place: Denise Hedges, Southern Methodist University (79 points)
2nd place: Shilei Wee, Debbie Lee Mei Yong, Singapore Management University (77 points)
3rd place: Todd Dickey, Cornell ILR School (71 points)

 

 

Views: 353

Comment

You need to be a member of ADRhub - Creighton NCR to add comments!

Join ADRhub - Creighton NCR

@ADRHub Tweets

ADRHub is supported and maintained by the Negotiation & Conflict Resolution Program at Creighton University

Members

© 2019   Created by ADRhub.com - Creighton NCR.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service