Visualizing ADR and ODR

Moderated by Bill Warters

 

Many of us are visual learners and creative thinkers. Sometimes a picture is really worth a thousand words. In this forum, we'll focus on the ways that visualization techniques can help us build understanding of conflict processes and promote engagement with Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) tools and techniques. With your help, we'll try to illustrate some core ADR and ODR processes, visualize current trends, and make connections between various aspects of the work. In addition to conflict resolution processes, we might also explore ways in which visualization techniques are being used in the waging of social conflict, for instance in social change and human rights campaigns. Finally, we are interested in sharing examples of the use of visualizations when working with parties engaged in complex conflicts as a way to help them move closer to agreement or mutual understanding. Your contributions, both artistic and reflective, are welcome.

 

Hi Folks. Welcome to the Visualizing ADR/ODR Forum. Glad to have you with us. Here are some ways you can engage with the materials I have prepared and with your other Cyberweek colleagues.

1) Browse our Visualizing ADR/ODR Pinterest Board of more than 150 images for one that strikes your fancy or stimulates your theoretical juices or which just seems highly relevent to understanding ODR. Copy the image link or embed code into your forum comment (use the "html" button in the edit bar before adding embed code) and then explain what you find interesting about it, or the questions it raises for you.

2) Share your creativity. Contribute a post or two with graphics on ADR or ODR that you have created or remixed. Gather praise, feedback, or silent admiration from your peers.

3) Comment on other postings to this forum, keeping the conversation going.

4) Dive boldly into the Mural.ly image canvas I have created to organize some of the many available images. Here's the link: http://mrl.li/PxboS7

5) If you are feeling really creative (or maybe just curious), you can try your hand at editing a shared murl.ly page exploring Online Dispute Resolution. To get started, visit http://mrl.li/QLje7z and use the password "cyberweekrocks". You can drag and drop content from the web (or a Pinterest item from our collection perhaps, or a video, etc) or your computer, and modify mural as you need. Use the toolbar on the left to add stickers or text or shapes.

Looking forward to the week ahead. Thanks for joining in.

Sincerely,

Bill Warters

Moderator Bio:

Bill Warters, Ph.D., is a faculty member at Wayne State University’s Department of Communication where he teaches courses on social conflict, mediation, and communication technologies and conflict among others. He is webmaster of CREducation.org, a site supporting conflict resolution in educational settings and developer of a new iPad app for conflict resolution educators. More information on Bill's various projects can be found at www.campus-adr.net.

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Greetings everyone. Welcome to Cyberweek 2012. I do hope you'll put on your visual thinking caps and help us get some conversations going. As an example of how you can embed a Pinterest image in this forum, I'm going to visit the Visualizing ODR Pinterest and select an image by clicking on it, selecting the embed code, and then using that to display it below. Note: I had to click on the "HTML" button in the comment tool bar when I was ready to paste code in a comment.

The one I've chosen is an illustration of the communication process that I think has direct relevance to Online Dispute Resolution. I think the choice of communication channel really matters depending on the goals of the communication. Do you agree? Why or why not?

 

Source: campus-adr.net via Bill on Pinterest

Hi Bill, thanks for your comment in the other thread. I will repost the image here, as you suggested. 

This image is of our new Signpost to Justice application. This application shows people what they can do to resolve their dispute (a consumer dispute in this example), and who may help them. The application was developed for the Dutch Legal Aid Board (rvr.org).

The example shows how to deal with a consumer dispute: first talk to the seller, then write a letter, and finally contact the consumer aid board. Each task is described in detail, and online tools are offered as well as links to professional assistance.

The visual on the bottom right shows the user what the cost of the various dispute resolution options are, and compares this to the amount involved in the dispute (the user's interest). In the example, the user learns that writing a letter is cost-effective, while a visit to the consumer aid boards might cost more than the €30 involved in the dispute.  

The application is available on www.rechtwijzer.nl, but is in Dutch only.

Jelle

Bill,

I'm looking forward to this forum during Cyberweek.  Sketchnoting is something very similar to inforgraphics and I use often.  Here's one of my describing the five elements of my research on nonverbal communication- METTA: Movement, Environment, Touch, Tone, Appearance.

See many more at this great site- Sketchnote Army

I am also going to encourage Brad Heckman, CEO of New York Peace  Institute, to check in here to share his great work.

Bill & co,


Here are a couple of blog posts I wrote about using visuals in our field:

Drawing out ideas...literally.

Extremely Sketchy & Incredibly Graphic

I'll post some examples of drawings I make/use in ADR trainings as well.

Cheers!

Brad


Hi Brad. Without even reading them, the evocative titles of your blog posts reminds me of the mediation process. By the way, I added the images "Not about Ewe" and "Process Conductor" to the Pinterest board I put together for this forum after seeing a tweet about them, so those images can be embedded here via Pinterest embed codes if you like. Nice stuff!


Hi Jeff. I just love the METTA tool - in coding and library stuff we are always exploring Metadata about items, so this fits well with my frames. And I have to say I get a laugh seeing the guy in the Posture part of your image, head hanging down, Reminds me of a Peanuts cartoon... Good stuff. You might be interested in the learning module we put together over at CREducation.org on nonverbals - Nonverbal Communication for Educators. It can be remixed and reused as desired.

Jeff Thompson said:

Bill,

I'm looking forward to this forum during Cyberweek.  Sketchnoting is something very similar to inforgraphics and I use often.  Here's one of my describing the five elements of my research on nonverbal communication- METTA: Movement, Environment, Touch, Tone, Appearance.

Bill et al,

Here are some pics of the illustrations I made for our trainings at New York Peace Institute...the medium is magic marker on flip chart paper.

mediator as orchestra conductor:

mediators, it's not about ewe (er, you.)

in litigation, we give our power to a judge, and a jury of our peeps.

as miles taught us in jazz, silence can be powerful. likewise in mediation.

mediation can be therapeutic, but it's not therapy.

here's me in action with drawings a go-go.

and here's a quick scketchnote i made about common interests within conflict.

Jelle, I like it. Good example of an illustration that is dynamic, changing to fit the circumstance of a given user, providing feedback kind of like the dashboard dials on your car, only this is for the navigation of conflict. I'm going to have to share a cartoon that I thought was funny in this regard. Now, if we could just build these kind of devices for cyber conflicts.



Jelle van Veenen said:

The example shows how to deal with a consumer dispute: first talk to the seller, then write a letter, and finally contact the consumer aid board. Each task is described in detail, and online tools are offered as well as links to professional assistance.

The visual on the bottom right shows the user what the cost of the various dispute resolution options are, and compares this to the amount involved in the dispute (the user's interest). In the example, the user learns that writing a letter is cost-effective, while a visit to the consumer aid boards might cost more than the €30 involved in the dispute.  

 

The application is available on www.rechtwijzer.nl, but is in Dutch only.

 

Jelle

Great images Brad. Thanks for sharing them. I can see from your "Brad action shot" that you have even more. Must make for an interesting training experience. Do you have any theories of practice about how images help in the training process particularly, and the kinds of information that is most appropriate for putting in graphical form? 

Brad Heckman said:

Bill et al,

Here are some pics of the illustrations I made for our trainings at New York Peace Institute...the medium is magic marker on flip chart paper.

mediator as orchestra conductor:

mediators, it's not about ewe (er, you.)

in litigation, we give our power to a judge, and a jury of our peeps.

as miles taught us in jazz, silence can be powerful. likewise in mediation.

mediation can be therapeutic, but it's not therapy.

here's me in action with drawings a go-go.

and here's a quick scketchnote i made about common interests within conflict.

One of the new trends that I personally have quite appreciated is the rise of the infographic as a way of communicating information and sharing with others. I used one of the free online infographic creation tools (Piktochart) and took some data from a chapter by our colleagues Arthur Pearlstein, Bryan Hanson and Noam Ebner from Creighton University from the new book Online Dispute Resolution: Theory and Practice and created this infographic on the State of ODR in North America. I hope you like it. Do other people have infographics that are relevant to our work that might be shared here?

 

Source: visual.ly via Bill on Pinterest

Hi Bill, 

I love the cartoon! In a way, this is exactly what we are trying to achieve: show people how to engage in a cooperative, problem-solving dialogue :)



Bill Warters said:

Jelle, I like it. Good example of an illustration that is dynamic, changing to fit the circumstance of a given user, providing feedback kind of like the dashboard dials on your car, only this is for the navigation of conflict. I'm going to have to share a cartoon that I thought was funny in this regard. Now, if we could just build these kind of devices for cyber conflicts.




Another trend in data visualization is the use of timelines to depict historical data. Some of you may have seen the video of an animated ODR history timeline that was shared last year during Cyberweek. This same data, updated with a few new items, is viewable in a slideshow-type display in the ODR learning module.

View it here:

ODR History Timeline

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